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Full text of "A search in secret Egypt"

THE PYRAMID                             45
Why were air channels, more than two hundred feet long, built to connect the burial vault which held this supposed sarcophagus with the outer air? Mummies do not need fresh air, while the workmen had no need to re-enter the chamber once they had roofed it in. I have seen no other chamber anywhere in Egypt, constructed to serve as a sepulchre of the royal dead, which possessed air channels.
Why was this presumed coffin placed in a room which is one hundred and fifty feet above the ground level, when all other Egyptian practice was to cut down into the rock below ground level for a burial vault? In fact, it was and is, a worldwide custom to dispose of the dead either under or on the ground. "Dust thou art and to dust thou shalt return," has ever been Nature's message to man.
Why should that lofty hall, the Grand Gallery, have been built to give access to the King's Chamber, and built over thirty feet high, when a continuation of the Ascending Passage, which is a mere four feet in height, would have served the purpose equally well and entailed much less labour through being far less complicated in construction than the Grand Gallery itself?
Why was a second room, the so-called Queen's Chamber, built near the first one? Pharaohs were never laid to rest near their queens, while a single mummy does not need two vaults. Had the Queen's Chamber contained the conventional wall paintings and inscriptions of Egyptian tombs, its existence as an ante-room might have been justified, but it is bare and as unornamented as the King's Chamber. And why, too, should the former have also been fitted with air shafts, sealed though their mouths were when discovered? Why should the builders have troubled to ventilate these two so-called tombs? It is a point worth repeating to oneself: the dead do not breathe.
No! One's intelligence, seeking the true cause of all this enormous expenditure of time, labour, material and money, refusing to accept either the prediction or tomb theories, must turn away in quest of some other explanation,
5
I mused long and often over this mystery of the Pyramids' purpose and spent many an hour stumbling over the rocky debris which surrounds them or wandering through the dim